Treatable Conditions

Our collective medical cannabis literature dates back 5,000 years (1) and cannabis was even added to the 1851 US Pharmacopeia (2) for its treatment of numerous illnesses including neuralgia, tetanus, typhus, cholera, rabies, dysentery, alcoholism, opiate addiction, anthrax, leprosy, incontinence, gout, conclusive disorders, tonsillitis, insanity, excessive menstrual bleeding, and uterine bleeding, among many others (3).

Today, Proposition 215, the California Compassionate Use Act of 1996, California Health & Safety Code 11362.5 allows for the use of medical cannabis with a physicians recommendation for treatment of (4): ·   Cancer·   Anorexia·   AIDS·   Chronic pain·   Spasticity·   Glaucoma·   Arthritis·   Migraines·   or any other illness for which marijuana provides relief. Since 1996 when the Compassionate Use Act was passed, research has yielded an even larger list or treatable conditions some of which include, but are not limited to (5):

  • Acquired Hypothyroidism
  • Acute Gastritis
  • Agoroaphobia
  • Aids Related Illnesses
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Alcoholism
  • Alopecia Areata
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Amphetamine Dependency
  • Amyloidosis
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Angina Pectoris
  • Ankylosis
  • Anorexia
  • Anorexia Nervosa
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Arteriosclerotic Heart Disease
  • Arthritis
  • Arthritis (Rheumatoid)
  • Arthropathy, Gout
  • Aspergers
  • Asthma
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism
  • Autoimmune Disease
  • Back Pain
  • Back Sprain
  • Bell’s Palsy
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Brain Tumor, Malignant
  • Bruxism
  • Bulimia
  • Cachexia
  • Caner (Adrenal Cortical, Endometrial, Prostate, Testicular, Uterine, etc)
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Cervical Disk Disease
  • Cervicobrachial Syndrome
  • Chemotherapy
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Chronic Pain
  • Chronic Renal Failure
  • Cocaine Dependence
  • Colitis
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Constipation
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Damage to Spinal Cord Nervous Tissue
  • Darier’s Disease
  • Degenerative Arthritus
  • Degenerative Arthropathy
  • Delirium Tremens
  • Dermatomyositis
  • Depression
  • Diabetes (Adult Onset, Insulin Dependent, Neuropathy, Peripheral Vascular Disease)
  • Diarrhea
  • Diverticulitis
  • Dysthymic Disorder
  • Eczema
  • Emphysema
  • Endometroisis
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa
  • Epididymitis
  • Epilepsy
  • Felty’s Syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Friedreich’s Ataxia
  • Gastritis
  • Genital Herpes
  • Glaucoma
  • Glioblastoma Multiforme
  • Graves Disease
  • Headaches (Cluster, Migraines, Tension)
  • Hemophilia A
  • Henoch-Schonlein Purpura
  • Hepatitus C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hospice Patients
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Hypertension
  • Hyperventilation
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Impotence
  • Inflamitory Autoimmune-mediated Arthritis
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Insomnia
  • Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED)
  • Intractable Vomiting
  • Lipomatosis
  • Lou Gehrig’s Disease
  • Lyme Disease
  • Lymphoma
  • Malignant Melanoma
  • Mania
  • Melorheostosis
  • Meniere’s Disease
  • Motion Sickness
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS)
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Muscle Spasms
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Myeloid Leukemia
  • Nail-Patella Syndrome
  • Nightmares
  • Obesity
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Opiate Dependence
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Panic Disorder
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Peritoneal Pain
  • Porphyria
  • Post Polio Syndrome (PPS)
  • Post-Traumatic Arthritis
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)
  • Prostatitis
  • Psoriasis
  • Pulmonary Fibrosis
  • Quadriplegia
  • Radiation Therapy
  • Raynaud’s Disease
  • Reiter’s Syndrome
  • Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS)
  • Rosacea
  • Schizoaffective Disorders
  • Schizophrenia
  • Scoliosis
  • Sedative Dependence
  • Seizures
  • Senile Dementia
  • Severe Nausea
  • Shingles
  • Sinusitis
  • Skeletal Muscular Spasticity
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Spasticity
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS)
  • Stuttering
  • Tardive Dyskinesia (TD)
  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ)
  • Tenosynovitis
  • Terminal Illness
  • Thyroiditis
  • Tic Douloureux
  • Tietze’s Syndrome
  • Tinnitus
  • Tobacco Dependence
  • Tourettes’s Syndrome
  • Trichotillomania
  • Viral Hepatitis
  • Wasting Syndrome
  • Whiplash
  • Wittmaack-Ekbom’s Syndrome

 

Prior to medical cannabis, patient’s only outlets for relief were prescription drugs, which are more often than not coupled with further debilitating side affects. For example, acute paid is most commonly treated with morphine and or codeine which often result in side affects such as nausea, sedation and dependency (6).

Cannabis has earned its title as the “miracle plant” due to its ability to provide similar treatment as prescription drugs to such a wide variety of conditions without the adverse side effects.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Cannabis will yield variable effects when used by different people under different circumstances. However, there are general strain recommendations which Diamond Cannabis Direct can make based on patient specific conditions. For more information regarding which strains may benefit your condition, please visit our strain list(hyperlink).

 

References:

  1. Elders “Myths About Medical Marijuana.” The Providence Journal, 26 March 2004. [cited 2015 Mar 23]
  2. “Pharmacopeia of the United States,” [Internet] National Medical Convention. PA: Lippincott, Grambo & CO. [cited 2015 Mar 23] Available from: https://archive.org/stream/pharmacopiaofuni1851unit#page/n7/mode/2up
  3. G. Boire and K. Feeney “Medical Marijuana Law,” Jan. 2007
  4. “Health and Safety Code Section 11357-11362.9” [Internet] State of California. [cited 2015 Mar 23] Available from: https://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=hsc&group=11001-12000&file=11357-11362.9
  5. “Illnesses Treatable with Medical Cannabis” [Internet]. United Patients Group. 2015 [cited 2015 Mar 23]. Available From: https://www.unitedpatientsgroup.com/resources/illnesses-treatable
  1. Joy, Janet E., et. al. Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. 1999, pp. 140.